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Infrared Platinum Heating Pad

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sara1 View Drop Down
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    Posted: Jan/17/2012 at 8:47pm
I got an Infrared Platinum Heating Pad 4 years ago as my Pain Management Dr. said it would help for annular tear pain in my lumbar spine and increase circulation. It penetrates two and a half inches rather than the usual half inch with a regular heating pad. Its a great tool for pain relief. Not to be used near a Spinal Cord Stimulator and as any medical device run it by your Dr. first. Sara
DDD of lumbar spine with sciatica to left hip,leg and foot. L4-L5 posterior disc bulge with prominent facets, L5-S1 prominent facets with a posterior osteocartilaginous bar. Mild bilateral foraminal narrowing Neck-reverse Lordosis of c-spine C6-C7 with impingement, numb hand and sore outer elbow. Bursitis to both knees. RN
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More extensive information on the benefits of Infrared Therapy 

Dr. Oz on the Oprah Show: High-Tech Ways to Extend Your Life

High-Tech Ways to Extend Your Life By Dr. Mehmet Oz The Oprah Winfrey Show | March 24, 2009.

From the Oprah.com website, accessed October 13, 2011

"The next life extension tool that Dr. Oz wheels onto Oprah's stage can help you burn 700 calories...without lifting a finger. Dr. Oz says his in-laws introduced him to the infrared sauna, which is slightly different than a normal sauna. 'It makes the same rays that come from the sun and filters out the UV radiation, so it only gives you the infrared radiation,' he says. 'That radiation that's infrared goes a little bit into your skin so, without heating you up and the external environment too much, it heats the body up.' After a few minutes in the sauna, Oprah says she's starting to feel the heat. Dr. Oz says the high temperature helps lower blood pressure and increase blood circulation. 'It gets your heart to beat faster, and it burns calories,' Dr. Oz says. 'It raises your metabolism a little bit, and also when you sweat, you sweat out toxins through the skin.'"

Therapeutic Effects of Infrared Therapy

in Lehmann, Williams, Wilkin

The following information has been summarized from Chapter 9 ofTherapeutic Heat and Cold, Fourth Edition, Editors Justus F. Lehmann, MD, Williams, and Wilkin, or concluded from data gathered there.

Generally it is accepted that heat produces the following desirable therapeutic effects:

1. Infrared heat increases the extensibility of collagen tissues. Tissues heated to 45 degrees Celsius and then stretched exhibit a nonelastic residual elongation of about 0.5 to 0.9 percent that persists after the stretch is removed. This does not occur in these same tissues when stretched at normal tissue temperature.

Stretching of tissue in the presence of heat would be especially valuable in working with ligaments, joint capsules, tendons, fasciae, and synovium that have become scarred, thickened, or contracted. Experiments cited clearly showed low-force stretching could produce significant residual elongation when heat is applied together with stretching or range of motion exercises.

2. Infrared heat decreases joint stiffness. There was a 20% decrease in rheumatoid finger joint stiffness at 45 degrees Celsius (112'F) as compared with 33 degrees Celsius (92'F) which correlated perfectly to both subjective and objective observation of stiffness. Speculation has it that any stiffened joint and thickened connective tissues may respond in a similar fashion.

3. Infrared heat relieves muscle spasms. Muscle spasms have long been observed to be reduced through the use of heat, be they secondary to underlying skeletal, joint, or neuropathological conditions. This result is possibly produced by the combined effect of heat on both primary and secondary afferent nerves from spindle cells and from its effect on Golgi tendon organs.

4. Infrared heat treatment leads to pain relief. Pain may be relieved via the reduction of attendant or secondary spasms. Pain is also at times related to ischemia due to tension or spasm that can be improved by hyperthermia that heat-induced vasodilation produces, thus breaking the feedback loop in which ischemia leads to further spasm and then more pain. Heat has been shown to reduce pain sensation by direct action on both free-nerve endings in tissues and on peripheral nerves. In one dental study, repeated heat applications led finally to abolishment of the whole nerve response responsible for pain arising from dental pulp. Heat may lead to increased endorphin production and a shutting down of the so-called "spinal gate" of Melzack and Wall, each of which can reduce pain.

Localized infrared therapy using lamps tuned to the 2 to 25 micron wave band is used for the treatment and relief of pain by over 40 reputable Chinese medical institutes.

5. Infrared heat increases blood flow. Heating one area of the body produces reflex-modulated vasodilators in distant-body areas, even in the absence of a change in core temperature. Heat one extremity and the contralateral extremity also dilates; heat a forearm and both lower extremities dilate.

Heating muscles produces an increased blood flow level similar to that seen during exercise. Temperature elevation also produces increased blood flow and dilation directly in capillaries, arterioles, and venules, probably through direct action on their smooth muscles. The release of bradykinin, released as a consequence of sweat gland activity, also produces increased blood flow and vasodilation.

Whole body hyperthermia, with a consequent core temperature elevation, further induces vasodilation via a hypothalamic-induced decrease in sympathetic tone on the arteriovenous anastomoses. Vasodilation is also produced by axonal reflexes that change vasomotor balance.

6. Infrared heat assists in resolution of inflammatory infiltrates, edema, and exudates. Increased peripheral circulation provides the transport needed to help evacuate edema, which can help inflammation, decrease pain, and help speed healing.

7. Infrared heat introduced in cancer therapy. More recently, infrared heat has been used in cancer therapy. This is a new experimental procedure that shows great promise in some cases when used properly. American researchers favor careful monitoring of the tumor temperature; whereas, the successes reported in Japan make no mention of such precaution.

8. Infrared heat affects soft tissue injury. Infrared healing is now becoming a leading edge care for soft tissue injuries to promote both relief in chronic or intractable "permanent" cases, and accelerated healing in newer injuries.

Speculation About Infrared Heat Effects on Blood Circulation

All of the following ailments may be associated to some degree with poor circulation and, thus may respond well to increased peripheral dilation associated with infrared treatments: Arthritis; Rheumatism; Sciatica; Strained muscles; Backache; Fatigue; Hemorrhoids; Stretch Marks; Nervous Tension; Menstrual Cramps; Children's Overtired Muscles; Varicose Veins; Neuritis; Bursitis; Leg and Decubitis ulcers (that fail to heal using conventional approaches); Post-operative edema (treatment has proven so effective, hospital stays were reduced by 25%); Peripheral occlusive disease ('the goal is to maintain an optimal blood flow rate to the affected part'. In general the temperature should be maintained at the highest level, which does not increase the circulatory discrepancy as shown by cyanosis and pain.' Therapeutic Heat and Cold, pp. 456-457).

2

The yellowish or dull color on the back indicates poor blood circulation.

3

The orange color of the middle and lower back indicates higher temperatures. 
 

4

The red color indicates temperature rise and improved blood circulation. 

Therapeutic Effects of Infrared Therapy

in Low & Reed

The following information has been summarized from Chapter 7 ofElectrotherapy Explained: Principles and Practice, Third Edition, by John Low, FCSP, DipTP, SRP and Ann Reed, MCSP, DipTP, SRP (Woburn, MA; Butterworth-Hainemann, 2001).

Physiological Effects of Temperature Changes on the Body Tissues:

1. Metabolism, being a series of chemical reactions, will increase with a rise of temperature. As with any chemical action, Metabolism is increased by a temperature rise. The actual change is about one-eighth (13%) for each 1oC so increasing the tissue temperature by, say, 4oC would increase the metabolic rate by some 60%. ... From a therapeutic point of view the local temperature changes that can, or should be achieved are limited in the deeper tissues to about 5 or 6oC above core temperature.

2. The resistance to flow in a blood vessel depends directly on the viscosity of the fluid, and raising the temperature lowers the viscosity. Viscosity changes affect not only the fluids in narrow vessels (blood and lymph), but also fluid movement within and throughout the tissue spaces.

3. Collagenous tissue extensibility has been shown (Lehmann et al., 1970) to increase within a therapeutically applicable range (40 - 45oC). Joint stiffness has been found to be reduced by heating (Wright and Johns, 1961); on cooling, joint stiffness is increased.

4. Blood vessels are changed during heating. Vasodilation occurs not only to distribute additional heat around the body, allowing compensatory heat loss from regions not heated, but also to protect the heated skin. Vasodilation due to heat is caused by: a) a direct effect on capillaries, arterioles and venules, causing them all to dilate (Lehmann and de Lateur, 1982); the nature of this process is not understood; b) an axon reflex; c) greater acidity of heated tissues from carbon dioxide and lactic acid released at a higher rate due to increased metabolism; d) an inflammatory reaction due to damaged proteins caused by heating.

5. Because of all the foregoing, there is an inevitable increase in fluid exchange across capillary walls and cell membranes. The acidity of the blood rises, and both carbon dioxide and oxygen tensions increase. There is an increase in lymph formation and a higher blood leucocyte count.

Therapeutic Effects of Local Tissue Heating:

1. Encouragement of Healing

Any condition in which increased metabolic rate, cell activity and local blood flow are beneficial can be appropriately treated by mild heating.

Chronic Inflammatory states and the stages of repair and regeneration are all appropriately treated with mild heating. All forms of therapeutic heating are applied to a wide range of chronic and post-traumatic conditions including arthroses, soft tissue lesions and post-surgical healing.

2. Control of Some Infections

Dry surface heating, achieved by infrared radiation or hot air, may have a particular role in the control of surface infections, such as chronic paronychia, a fungal (candida) infection, or other infections. Surface drying will diminish bacterial colonization.

3. Relief of Pain

Surveys of patients with persistent pain have found that some form of heat ranks highly, after analgesia, among the measures used by patients to control pain. For example, Barbour et al. (1986) found that heat was the most effective non-analgesic method of pain control for 68% of the cancer outpatients in their sample.

The stimulation of sensory heat receptors may activate the pain gate mechanism. Cervero et al., 1993, suggest that the development of hyperalgesia as a consequence of mild heating may contribute to pain modulation.

The sympathetic skin response to pain was found to be reduced by therapeutic heat applied in a distant region (Yagiz On et al., 1997.) The authors suggest that this clear analgesic effect of heating may be due to suppression of cortical pain as a consequence of increased levels of endorphins and possibly due to local inhibition of both afferent and efferent C fibers.

Vascular changes could also reduce local pain, as blood flow "washes out" some pain provoking metabolites resulting from tissue injury, including prostaglandins and bradykinin (Lehmann and Letour, 1982; Wadsworth and Chanmugan, 1980.)

Other mechanisms that may account for pain relief include the reduction of muscle spasm, the sedative effect, and a decrease in sympathetic nervous system activity which is said to promote vasodilation in deeper blood vessels (Michlovitz, 1986.)

4. Reduction of Muscle Spasm

Investigated by Lehmann and de Lateur, 1982. Since pain and muscle spasm are interdependent, a reduction in one will cause a reduction in the other.

5. Sedative Effect

The sedative effect of superficial heat could be a reflex phenomenon due to rise in skin temperature itself, or a consequence of pain relief (Lehmann and de Lateur, 1982.)

The use of heat for pain relief is primarily based on empirical observation and the underlying mechanisms are unknown (Michlovitz, 1986.)

6. Increase of Range of Joint Motion

There seem to be three mechanisms involved here:


Analgesic effects allowing greater tolerance of stretching (Michlovitz, 1986)
Reduction in viscosity of tissues (Wright and Johns, 1961)
Increased collagen extensibility at higher temperature (Lehmann et al., 1970)

 

 

DDD of lumbar spine with sciatica to left hip,leg and foot. L4-L5 posterior disc bulge with prominent facets, L5-S1 prominent facets with a posterior osteocartilaginous bar. Mild bilateral foraminal narrowing Neck-reverse Lordosis of c-spine C6-C7 with impingement, numb hand and sore outer elbow. Bursitis to both knees. RN
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Rocken Roni Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Nov/29/2012 at 1:52am
Something to think about for sure.

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1st injured Feb, 1997. Was told it was "Soft Tissue" and sent back to work - no X-rays
Late 1997 attended 1st Rehab Program to strengthen back. Mid 98 PCP took me off work. Tried going back to work over the next couple years, mostly off work due to pain.
June 2000, met with OS for first time. Did MRI , damage was L5-S1 totally blown out. Surgery done Jan, 2001.
Another Rehab program late 2001, attempted to go back to work early 2002. Slipped on water, fell flat on back screw fusion broke.
Went to 3rd Rehab program summer 2002.
Oct 2003 - 2nd Surgery, due to broken screw, had to operate from the front.
No improvement. Attended 4th Rehab program in 2004, at time It was decided NO work.
March 2006, had 3rd Surgery, this time fusion and instrumentation from Si to L3.
June 2008 Surgeon finally admitted I had Failed Back Surgery.
August 2009 WCB Finally put me on Long Term Disability
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote sara1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan/22/2015 at 11:52am
Today only in Canada this Infrared is on sale at the Shopping Channel.ca Its $50. cheaper than what I paid for it years ago!
DDD of lumbar spine with sciatica to left hip,leg and foot. L4-L5 posterior disc bulge with prominent facets, L5-S1 prominent facets with a posterior osteocartilaginous bar. Mild bilateral foraminal narrowing Neck-reverse Lordosis of c-spine C6-C7 with impingement, numb hand and sore outer elbow. Bursitis to both knees. RN
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote tkay Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan/22/2015 at 1:25pm
Interesting how when technology moves along gadgets get less expensive.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Bailey Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan/22/2015 at 1:36pm
How much is it Sara?
 
Nice to see you Thumbs Up. How's life treating you?
DDD C3-C6 with multiple osteophytes causing both moderate foraminal and canal stenosis and flattening and impinging on the spinal cord
Cervical Facet arthritis
Chronic Pain Syndrome
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote sara1 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: Jan/22/2015 at 1:51pm
Hi It's only $199. for only until tomorrow morning at 7 am. 


I have not forgotten any of you all in my prayers. 
DDD of lumbar spine with sciatica to left hip,leg and foot. L4-L5 posterior disc bulge with prominent facets, L5-S1 prominent facets with a posterior osteocartilaginous bar. Mild bilateral foraminal narrowing Neck-reverse Lordosis of c-spine C6-C7 with impingement, numb hand and sore outer elbow. Bursitis to both knees. RN
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